Category: House & Home



Food scraps with Bokashi bran sprinkled on top, in a fermenting bin

Bokashi composting is an anaerobic process that relies on inoculated bran to ferment organic material in a tightly closed container.

June 2017 Update: I first posted this on December 26, 2016. Since then. I’ve added food scraps and some other biodegradable materials into my Bokashi bin, let it sit, drain off the liquid—all the things one should do to maintain the fermentation. During this time, I saw a white, fluffy mold grow on the edge of the bin in quarter-sized spots. It never got out of hand, just something I hadn’t expected.

My verdict after 7 months of use: the waste didn’t break down as much as I had hoped. Most of what I’d added remained visibly discernible (I could still tell what was the sweet potatoes, rinds, and other foods). I also need to think about the next stage for this fermented waste, as I don’t have a lawn to bury it into to further decompose. As I learned, this is not something you can add to vermicomposting, as the worms RUN AWAY from the fermented shlosh (I ended up getting worms to add to my GT2 tower). In other words, this might be a good idea for someone who has a backyard, or has gardener friends, but not for someone who lives in apartment. I’ll keep the remainder of my original post for those interested in the basics.

If you’re a longtime reader, you’ll know that part of my green lifestyle involves composting and gardening. I just moved into an apartment without a patio or outdoor space, but I still want to compost and grow some of my food. After doing some research, I decided to get a Bokashi composting bin (this one, if you’re curious) and a Garden Tower 2 (GT2) gardening system. The Bokashi bin helps breakdown food scraps through fermentation, which I then put in the GT2 to finish decomposing and feed my veggies, eliminating the need for a large compost bin and worms.

I’ll make another post about vermicomposting (which I did before I moved and recommend if you can maintain it), and can even talk a little bit more about my gardening plans. Today’s post, however, is really to introduce the concept of Bokashi composting. Continue reading


This is my first winter on the East Coast and I’m really starting to miss having sunny skies and green plants all around me. I’m going to grow some potted plants indoors using cuttings, found rocks, and tin cans to re-purpose as pots. I have a general idea of what I want, but it never hurts to get some inspiration…

Bring the outdoors in to your home with these ideas for how to make small-scale plant holders, grow self-sustaining indoor gardens and more.

Source: 10 DIY Indoor Gardens for the Urban Gardener | eHow


Image of a person rolling lettuce in a dark towel.

Image of a person rolling lettuce in a dark towel.

Almost like milk, plastic is found in all kinds of things. I didn’t realize cans are coated with BPA—I’ll have to start buying dried beans and budget soak time into my cooking (oof!). The produce in towels trick seems clever, too.

Have you tried any of these “life hacks”?


A set of various artisan soaps, lotions, and other body care products

All natural does not equate to safe, ecologically sound and healthy.  Bacteria, salmonella, cocaine, and staph germs are natural but I dont want to put them on my skin. Chemicals are not bad. Everything is a chemical. Water is a chemical, oxygen is a chemical, we are chemicals.  Synthetic products are not necessarily evil. I do understand customers concerns about being as close to nature as possible so I offer a range of products fit those needs. I always label my products truthfully, please buy from a soapmaker that is honest.

via Preservatives vs all natural.


CD mosaic glazing flower pot

What an excellent way to reuse those scratched or otherwise unusable CDs.

From The DIY ShowEarth Day -DIY Gazing Flower Pot


This is a great DIY project to make a couch/daybed out of wood shipping pallets for very cheap:

How to Upcycle a Pallet into a Couch | Brit + Co.

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