Category: Political



In the light of King’s powerful demagogic speech. … We must mark him now, if we have not done so before, as the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation from the standpoint of communism, the Negro, and national security. —FBI Director William C. Sullivan, Enemies: A History of the FBI

Today the USA celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the same country that arrested him 30 times and used its powerful surveillance apparatus, the FBI and the NSA, to target him as “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation” right after he gave his famous “I Have A Dream” speech. This is the speech that colorblind adherent exploit when they resist efforts to address racial inequity. But Dr. King’s speech is the same one in which he denounced police brutality against Black people, and insisted that it was “the time to make real the promises of democracy.”

It comes as no surprise then that Dr. King was later assassinated a mere 5 years later—some, including his family, say by the government. Continue reading

Advertisements

INDIAN RURAL LIFE - A woman herding two cows.

A woman herding two cows. Credit: Vijayamurthy sadagopalan

With more than 800 million people living in extreme poverty and many more struggling to make an honest living, it is clear that the current global economic model isn’t working for everyone. Economic growth often comes at the expense of the majority, with short-term financial gains trumping long-term sustainability. The current global obsession with economic growth, alongside the enormous over-consumption enjoyed by the wealthiest people on the planet, has brought us all to the brink of catastrophic climate change.

Earthrise presenter Ndoni Khanyile travels to Burkina Faso where farmers are embracing agroecology as a means of feeding the most vulnerable and visits villagers in Uttar Pradesh in India, who are turning to solar microgrids for energy.

Watch the video at: Another Giant Leap – Al Jazeera English


A blonde woman wearing faux-native headdress. Source: Native Appropriations

A blonde woman wearing faux-native headdress. Source: Native Appropriations

Culture is the tangible and intangible manifestations of a people’s heritage, such as music, language, dress, dance, foods, and so on. As social creatures, we humans thrive when we can participate in and enjoy our own culture and celebrate our heritage. And while it is important to our lives, questions of what culture is, how we participate in it, who gets to participate, and what does participation look like, are often forgotten in mainstream discussions of sustainability. Continue reading


The racial privilege of voting with your dollars to create a "good food" system

The racial privilege of voting with your dollars to create a “good food” system

This text-heavy infographic from the Sistah Vegan Project complicates a often-spouted mantra: vote with your dollars. I must admit, I have used this phrase when I explain why I use my class privilege to purchase foods that are ethically-sourced and less environmentally detrimental than conventional goods. I’m aware that to say (and act) so is indeed a privilege—if you live in a food desert with hardly any fresh veggies, it’s not practical or practicable to assert that one should “vote” for organic tofu and kale over french fries at McDonalds. But I hadn’t thought of the racial implications to this mantra: if you live in a white supremacist country that intentionally seeks to incarcerated the descendants of slaves, voting (literally and with one’s money) is definitely impacted by race, not only class.

Check out the image and the listed sources for a more in-depth analysis of these issues: The Racial Privilege of Voting With Your Dollars to Create a ‘Good Food’ System |via Sistah Vegan Project


[Image of a pile of colorful hemp seeds with the caption: Prama Love Hemp Foods. 10% of our profits go to Silencing the Reality of Systemic Racism Foundation for Health

Source: Sistah Vegan

Another thought-provoking and critical piece by Dr. A. Breeze Harper that challenges the very notion of “healthy eating” in a country dominated by state violence, violence, and the demonization of Black bodies. This quote sums the piece up nicely:

I think about all the symbols and suggestions of healing and health in this Berkeley store that I frequent that put ‘good health’ into a vacuum; a vacuum that is suggesting that all one needs to be healthy is to buy and eat the right organic/natural and local foods. I see so many white and smiling faces on these products or magazines that are void of any conversations around how unhealthy racism and normative whiteness are; that refuse to even try to explain that the food system, health system, and systems of racism are interlocking…and that all the Spirulina, kale, or beets in the world cannot create a healthy USA if the food system– even the local and organic food system– exists in a foodscape anchored on centuries of systemic racism, white supremacy, and the demonization of Black bodies as ‘worthy of being brutalized’.

Read the full post over at Sistah Vegan.


A police line (police tape) established at the scene of a car crash in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Source: Tony Webster, Wikipedia

One common and troubling obstacle that human and non-human animal rights advocates face is the insistence that violence against others is “justified” because of some perceived or imagined threat. Exploitation and killing of marginalized people and animals often hinges upon the claim that “I feared for my life,” or “it was my life or theirs.” Of course, there is a general agreement that self-preservation is fundamental to the right to life, and whatever one does in response to a threat of one’s life is presumed justified until proven otherwise.

However, when we refuse to challenge or even question this claim, the opportunity to “prove otherwise” is completely forestalled, and opens the door to abuse and violence under the pretext of self-preservation. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: