Tag Archive: animals



A police line (police tape) established at the scene of a car crash in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Source: Tony Webster, Wikipedia

One common and troubling obstacle that human and non-human animal rights advocates face is the insistence that violence against others is “justified” because of some perceived or imagined threat. Exploitation and killing of marginalized people and animals often hinges upon the claim that “I feared for my life,” or “it was my life or theirs.” Of course, there is a general agreement that self-preservation is fundamental to the right to life, and whatever one does in response to a threat of one’s life is presumed justified until proven otherwise.

However, when we refuse to challenge or even question this claim, the opportunity to “prove otherwise” is completely forestalled, and opens the door to abuse and violence under the pretext of self-preservation. Continue reading


Slaughterhouse worker mid-swing in dismembering a cow's body hanging from the ceiling

Source: Remo Cassella

From exploited workers to the animals to our very democracy, animal agriculture* is bad for everyone involved—except the folks who profit from it.

The growing demand for cheap meat means the animal food industry must raise and kill animals in high volume with minimal regard for well-being, health, or safety. This in turn leads to poor working conditions in an already violent, stressful job. Poor waste management of factory farms leads to health problems in surrounding communities. And animal agriculture lobbyists pressure (and often work in) the government to channel tax dollars and create laws that protect and maximize their profits. Continue reading


Black "Eat Your Ethics" tote bag from Food Empowerment Project

Black “Eat Your Ethics” tote bag from Food Empowerment Project

Water privatization, overgrazing, pesticides, food security. These are clearly issues of sustainability with regards to our food systems. Yet, the term “sustainability” doesn’t quite adequately address related issues of labor rights, food access, and environmental racism that are also part of the path that our food takes to get to our plate.

This is where food justice comes in. Food justice is a holistic, equitable, and intersectional approach to food systems and a welcome alternative to the growing food movement that led by some of the most privileged individuals around.

There are many great organizations working on food justice issues. I’m particularly impressed with Food Empowerment Project and had been meaning to write about the organization for a while. Founded by activist lauren Ornelas in 2006, F.E.P. seeks to promote a more just and sustainable world by informing consumers of the impact their food choices have on other people, animals, and the environment. One of my earliest exposures to F.E.P.’s work came when I was first seeking ethical alternatives to conventional slave-made chocolate.

F.E.P. is perhaps best known for its Chocolate List, a resource that many chocolate-lovers have come to rely on for ethical sources for chocolate. I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know lauren and even help represent F.E.P. at community outreach events. She is what I wish I could be, and F.E.P. the organization I wish I had founded. F.E.P.’s approach to food justice addresses all the issues that are impacted by our current food systems: animals, the environment, human labor and slavery, and our food choices. Not only does F.E.P. take an intersectional approach to food justice, but the information material is very accessible and informative.

Check out the F.E.P. website FoodIsPower.org

 


Factory farm with cows, polluted water. Source: Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

Factory farm with cows, polluted water. Source: Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

Half the world’s grain crop is fed to animals raised for food, while an estimated 1 billion people are malnourished, and 6 million children starve to death every year. … “Most hunger deaths are due to chronic malnutrition caused by inequitable distribution and inefficient use of existing food resources. At the same time, wasteful agricultural practices, such as the intensive livestock operations known as factory farming, are rapidly polluting and depleting the natural resources upon which all life depends. Trying to produce more foods by these methods would lead only to more water pollution, soil degradation, and, ultimately, hunger.”

via Environment « Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary.


california lone wolf

The lone wolf of California may not be as lonely as the experts thought.

The gray wolf, known to scientists as OR7 and to wolf advocates as Journey, was spotted last week in Modoc County cavorting with a group of coyotes.

Karen Kovacs, the wildlife program manager for the California Department of Fish and Game, said state biologists, game wardens and a federal trapper were in the southwestern part of the county Tuesday to discuss with ranchers the presence of the wolf, which had been tracked by GPS signals to the area.

Kovacs said two of the three coyotes came up right next to the 90- to 100-pound wolf.

“They were in very close proximity to OR7,” she said. “I think it was kind of a mutual thing. Maybe there had been some prior contact. They did go off in the same direction together, but shortly after that OR7 went off by himself and then disappeared out of view.”

Biologist Richard Shinn snapped only the second known photograph of OR7 before he vanished into the woods. The consensus was that he looked healthy.

The odd flirtation with the coyotes was a surprise considering that wolves and coyotes are normally rivals. Wolf packs in Yellowstone National Park and other locations where the two species intermingle will attack and kill any coyotes seen on their territory.

Department experts said, however, that it is not unheard of for transient gray wolves to befriend coyotes or domestic dogs on their journeys, apparently just for the company.

Read more at California’s lone wolf seen mingling with coyotes.


Source: Diabetes Food Recipes

Join the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) 21-say Vegan Kickstart program!

Based on research by Neal Barnard, M.D., one of America’s leading health advocates, this program is designed for anyone who wants to explore and experience the health benefits of a vegan diet. Low-fat vegan—plant-based—diets are the easiest way to trim excess weight, prevent diabetes, cut cholesterol, lower blood pressure, prevent and reverse heart disease, and reduce cancer risk. They even trim our carbon footprint.

The Kickstart gives you access to:

21 vegan kickstart stuff

Sign up here and see how easy it is to improve your diet in 21 days.

via PCRM 21-Day Vegan Kickstart Program: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine 21-Day Vegan Kickstart.

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