Tag Archive: development



shameonsafewayfinal25280022529

At a public meeting, Vallejo Board of Supervisor Erin Hannigan informed us that Safeway had put a deed on their former property. This deed prevented another grocery store from using it for the same purpose. In our recently released Vallejo report, we highlight on page 15 the impact this had on the community, which left the neighborhood and surrounding areas without access to a grocery store.

Please join us in demanding that Safeway/Albertsons eliminate restrictive deeds on their former properties that prevent new grocery stores from replacing them.

Source: Appetite for Justice by Food Empowerment Project: Shame on Safeway


INDIAN RURAL LIFE - A woman herding two cows.

A woman herding two cows. Credit: Vijayamurthy sadagopalan

With more than 800 million people living in extreme poverty and many more struggling to make an honest living, it is clear that the current global economic model isn’t working for everyone. Economic growth often comes at the expense of the majority, with short-term financial gains trumping long-term sustainability. The current global obsession with economic growth, alongside the enormous over-consumption enjoyed by the wealthiest people on the planet, has brought us all to the brink of catastrophic climate change.

Earthrise presenter Ndoni Khanyile travels to Burkina Faso where farmers are embracing agroecology as a means of feeding the most vulnerable and visits villagers in Uttar Pradesh in India, who are turning to solar microgrids for energy.

Watch the video at: Another Giant Leap – Al Jazeera English


Image of a cartoon planet earth crowded with people, some of which are falling off.

China recently announced that it would replace its one-child policy with a two-child policy, adding more than 30 million people to the country’s labor force by 2050. Many have criticized the most populated nation in the world for such a draconian law because infringes upon people’s freedom and reproductive autonomy.

Yet the same logic behind the policy is often used by people who claim to care about the environment. The earth can’t support many more people, the environmentalists say in response to population estimates of over 8 billion. Under this view, in order to preserve natural resources, we must slow global human population growth. They talk about “overpopulation” and cite projected rates of population growth in the global south and subsequent wildlife loss and environmental degradation. Continue reading


Felled trees evoking the fate of the earth's rainforests as they are cut to make room for palm plantations

Palm oil tends to be in everything these days. Back before exploiting it was this profitable, palm oil used to be demonized as being unhealthy, filled with the “bad fats” people should avoid. Times have changed now that palm oil can be produced cheaply through bulldozing Indonesian and Malaysian rainforests.

Read more on why you should avoid palm oil: Say No To Palm Oil | Whats The Issue.


Factory farm with cows, polluted water. Source: Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

Factory farm with cows, polluted water. Source: Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

Half the world’s grain crop is fed to animals raised for food, while an estimated 1 billion people are malnourished, and 6 million children starve to death every year. … “Most hunger deaths are due to chronic malnutrition caused by inequitable distribution and inefficient use of existing food resources. At the same time, wasteful agricultural practices, such as the intensive livestock operations known as factory farming, are rapidly polluting and depleting the natural resources upon which all life depends. Trying to produce more foods by these methods would lead only to more water pollution, soil degradation, and, ultimately, hunger.”

via Environment « Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary.


Flooded home in Durban, South Africa

Source: AlertNet

Two weeks ago we saw the end of the UN climate talks in Durban, South Africa. I posted earlier about the frustrations participants felt, as they knew that whatever came of the discussions would be inadequate to address climate change. Friends of the Earth International, an international grassroots environmental network, kept a close eye as the world leaders met. At the end, they had this to say about the talks:

The UN climate talks in Durban were a failure and take the world a significant step back by further undermining an already flawed, inadequate multilateral system that is supposed to address the climate crisis, according to Friends of the Earth International.

Developed countries engaged in a smoke and mirrors trick of delivering rhetoric but no action, failed to commit to urgently needed deep emissions cuts, and even backtracked on past commitments to address the climate crisis, said Friends of the Earth International.

[…] “After bailing out the banks, rich countries at the climate talks refused to commit a single new dollar for climate finance for developing countries. They  insisted on allowing multinational corporations and global financial elites to directly access the Green Climate Fund, and pushed through the opening up of further possibilities for speculation via the dangerous carbon market bubble. It is clear in whose interests this deal has been advanced, and it isn’t the 99% of people around the world”

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