Tag Archive: history



Photo: Chefcola/ Instagram/dresnaps

If you really want to be an ethical vegan, research all your food – even the plants.

Indeed, a great frustration I have with vegans in the global north is the erasure of human exploitation in food systems. Vegans are typically concerned with the wellbeing of charismatic animals and are unbothered about the plight of “less attractive animals” or humans who are impacted by their food choices. And although ethical consumption is all but impossible in an unethical economic system, it is an ideal that global northerners (including myself) nevertheless strive for.

This quest among vegans and non-vegans to ethically consume is frequently done by (re)creating ideas and practices that actually have historical precedent. Even the term veganism, a word coined in the UK in 1940s, is really another way of saying strict vegetarianism, although at many points in history, vegetarianism was by definition “strict.” These new frameworks only come about because we have forgotten their historical predecessors.

Perhaps the most remarkable of these forgotten traditions is plant-based diets among African peoples, the subject of today’s featured article from This Is Africa: African vegans are a return to tradition. The above quote is from the article and said in passing; the central message, in fact, is that of returning to a traditional diet: Continue reading

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Before contact, Europeans had very poor diets. Most people were farmers and grew wheat and vegetables and raised cows and sheep to eat. They rarely washed themselves, and had many diseases because they often let their animals live with them.

Continue reading at: An Indigenous History of North America


Thanksgiving is just around the corner and so many topics come to mind that I could write about. There’s giving thanks to relieve ourselves of our money on Friday, “pardoning” a pair of turkeys for the crime of not being human (naturally, they deserve the death penalty), and, of course, the whole point of the holiday: to celebrate the beginnings of the first Occupy movement—”Occupy America”, a European-led movement that successfully took over the continent and turned Americans into the 1% (well, more like 0.9%), but without any of the perks like having a say in the nation’s future.

That’s something worth celebrating, right?

Incidentally, you can learn about having a gentle Thanksgiving this year or in years to come.

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