Tag Archive: indigenous



“The difference between a liberal and a progressive is that a liberal is open to everyone’s views; a progressive is as narrow-minded and judgmental (more?) than any conservative.” — Doug Reitsch, Pharmacist at Kamilche Pharmacy in Shelton, WA

According to this myopic internet definition, being “open to everyone’s views” is good and something people should strive for. That is easy, of course, if “everyone’s views” are benign. And if they are not, you can still be “open to everyone’s views” if you are secure in your comforts, privileges, and power, and “everyone’s views” do not perpetuate your oppression. Continue reading


The American Association for the Advancement of Science discussed climate change and drought’s effects on Southwestern tribes.

The snowpack in the Sierra Nevada was at its lowest in 500 years during 2015, and that is bad news for tribes farther south of the mountain range that straddles California and Nevada.

Southwestern tribes were the focus of a recent symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington D.C., with climate change, drought and water-distribution inequities at the fore.

“American Indian tribal communities who reside near the terminus of the Truckee-Carson River system in northern Nevada are especially vulnerable to declining water supplies,” the AAAS said in a statement summing up the meeting, which was held in mid-February. “In a region with such a fragile water system, uncertainty about the future of traditional life ways, hunting, fishing, and farming looms large.”

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/29/tribes-and-researchers-study-climate-using-science-and-traditional-knowledge-163574

 


Image of workers cleaning and sorting pineapples.

Source: Consumers International

Here’s a quick post on the situation in Costa Rica about pineapple union workers and exploitation they face: Banana Workers’ Strike Highlights Abuses by Corporations in Costa Rica

Consumers International also has a case study on pineapples, which investigates working conditions in the pineapple industry and its impact on communities and the environment in Costa Rica.

As a consumer, what do with this information? Do you choose to continue to financially support exploitation because it’s more convenient? Do you search for alternatives, or give up whatever it is? When you know better, do you do better? Let me know in the comments.

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