Tag Archive: justice



“The difference between a liberal and a progressive is that a liberal is open to everyone’s views; a progressive is as narrow-minded and judgmental (more?) than any conservative.” — Doug Reitsch, Pharmacist at Kamilche Pharmacy in Shelton, WA

According to this myopic internet definition, being “open to everyone’s views” is good and something people should strive for. That is easy, of course, if “everyone’s views” are benign. And if they are not, you can still be “open to everyone’s views” if you are secure in your comforts, privileges, and power, and “everyone’s views” do not perpetuate your oppression. Continue reading


The situation of lead-contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, is fundamentally about human rights, a group of United Nations experts today said, urging the United States to protect the rights of children and others who are most at risk from pollution and toxic chemicals.

“No parent should have to endure the mental torment that will haunt parents in Flint, and no child should be denied the right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health,” said the experts, whose expertise include hazardous wastes, health, water and sanitation, indigenous peoples, minorities, and racism.

Read on at: United Nations News Centre – UN human rights experts urge US to increase efforts to address water contamination


When asked directly whether environmental racism was at play in Flint’s water crisis, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder replied last month, “Absolutely not.”

And yet…

Source: Race Best Predicts Whether You Live Near Pollution | The Nation


In the light of King’s powerful demagogic speech. … We must mark him now, if we have not done so before, as the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation from the standpoint of communism, the Negro, and national security. —FBI Director William C. Sullivan, Enemies: A History of the FBI

Today the USA celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the same country that arrested him 30 times and used its powerful surveillance apparatus, the FBI and the NSA, to target him as “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation” right after he gave his famous “I Have A Dream” speech. This is the speech that colorblind adherent exploit when they resist efforts to address racial inequity. But Dr. King’s speech is the same one in which he denounced police brutality against Black people, and insisted that it was “the time to make real the promises of democracy.”

It comes as no surprise then that Dr. King was later assassinated a mere 5 years later—some, including his family, say by the government. Continue reading


Image of workers cleaning and sorting pineapples.

Source: Consumers International

Here’s a quick post on the situation in Costa Rica about pineapple union workers and exploitation they face: Banana Workers’ Strike Highlights Abuses by Corporations in Costa Rica

Consumers International also has a case study on pineapples, which investigates working conditions in the pineapple industry and its impact on communities and the environment in Costa Rica.

As a consumer, what do with this information? Do you choose to continue to financially support exploitation because it’s more convenient? Do you search for alternatives, or give up whatever it is? When you know better, do you do better? Let me know in the comments.


The racial privilege of voting with your dollars to create a "good food" system

The racial privilege of voting with your dollars to create a “good food” system

This text-heavy infographic from the Sistah Vegan Project complicates a often-spouted mantra: vote with your dollars. I must admit, I have used this phrase when I explain why I use my class privilege to purchase foods that are ethically-sourced and less environmentally detrimental than conventional goods. I’m aware that to say (and act) so is indeed a privilege—if you live in a food desert with hardly any fresh veggies, it’s not practical or practicable to assert that one should “vote” for organic tofu and kale over french fries at McDonalds. But I hadn’t thought of the racial implications to this mantra: if you live in a white supremacist country that intentionally seeks to incarcerated the descendants of slaves, voting (literally and with one’s money) is definitely impacted by race, not only class.

Check out the image and the listed sources for a more in-depth analysis of these issues: The Racial Privilege of Voting With Your Dollars to Create a ‘Good Food’ System |via Sistah Vegan Project

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