Tag Archive: politics



Transcending is a perpetual one-way street for black people, yet famous white people like Antonin Scalia, David Bowie and Merle Haggard weren’t asked to transcend their whiteness for black people to recognize their importance. They didn’t have to transcend being Italian-American, British or an Okie from Muskogee. They were just accepted for being who they were.

Continue reading at: Muhammad Ali and Other Black Celebrities Didn’t ‘Transcend Race’


The situation of lead-contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, is fundamentally about human rights, a group of United Nations experts today said, urging the United States to protect the rights of children and others who are most at risk from pollution and toxic chemicals.

“No parent should have to endure the mental torment that will haunt parents in Flint, and no child should be denied the right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health,” said the experts, whose expertise include hazardous wastes, health, water and sanitation, indigenous peoples, minorities, and racism.

Read on at: United Nations News Centre – UN human rights experts urge US to increase efforts to address water contamination


The top United Nations human rights official today urged United States authorities to proceed with great caution in their legal efforts to break the encryption on an iPhone linked to the investigation into the mass killings in San Bernardino, California, saying the case could have broader implications for digital security and human rights.

Read on at: United Nations News Centre – Authorities in Apple-FBI case ‘risk unlocking Pandora’s Box’ – UN human rights chief


The American Association for the Advancement of Science discussed climate change and drought’s effects on Southwestern tribes.

The snowpack in the Sierra Nevada was at its lowest in 500 years during 2015, and that is bad news for tribes farther south of the mountain range that straddles California and Nevada.

Southwestern tribes were the focus of a recent symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington D.C., with climate change, drought and water-distribution inequities at the fore.

“American Indian tribal communities who reside near the terminus of the Truckee-Carson River system in northern Nevada are especially vulnerable to declining water supplies,” the AAAS said in a statement summing up the meeting, which was held in mid-February. “In a region with such a fragile water system, uncertainty about the future of traditional life ways, hunting, fishing, and farming looms large.”

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/29/tribes-and-researchers-study-climate-using-science-and-traditional-knowledge-163574

 


In the light of King’s powerful demagogic speech. … We must mark him now, if we have not done so before, as the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation from the standpoint of communism, the Negro, and national security. —FBI Director William C. Sullivan, Enemies: A History of the FBI

Today the USA celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the same country that arrested him 30 times and used its powerful surveillance apparatus, the FBI and the NSA, to target him as “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation” right after he gave his famous “I Have A Dream” speech. This is the speech that colorblind adherent exploit when they resist efforts to address racial inequity. But Dr. King’s speech is the same one in which he denounced police brutality against Black people, and insisted that it was “the time to make real the promises of democracy.”

It comes as no surprise then that Dr. King was later assassinated a mere 5 years later—some, including his family, say by the government. Continue reading


A blonde woman wearing faux-native headdress. Source: Native Appropriations

A blonde woman wearing faux-native headdress. Source: Native Appropriations

Culture is the tangible and intangible manifestations of a people’s heritage, such as music, language, dress, dance, foods, and so on. As social creatures, we humans thrive when we can participate in and enjoy our own culture and celebrate our heritage. And while it is important to our lives, questions of what culture is, how we participate in it, who gets to participate, and what does participation look like, are often forgotten in mainstream discussions of sustainability. Continue reading

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