Tag Archive: sustainability



The American Association for the Advancement of Science discussed climate change and drought’s effects on Southwestern tribes.

The snowpack in the Sierra Nevada was at its lowest in 500 years during 2015, and that is bad news for tribes farther south of the mountain range that straddles California and Nevada.

Southwestern tribes were the focus of a recent symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington D.C., with climate change, drought and water-distribution inequities at the fore.

“American Indian tribal communities who reside near the terminus of the Truckee-Carson River system in northern Nevada are especially vulnerable to declining water supplies,” the AAAS said in a statement summing up the meeting, which was held in mid-February. “In a region with such a fragile water system, uncertainty about the future of traditional life ways, hunting, fishing, and farming looms large.”

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/29/tribes-and-researchers-study-climate-using-science-and-traditional-knowledge-163574

 

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When asked directly whether environmental racism was at play in Flint’s water crisis, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder replied last month, “Absolutely not.”

And yet…

Source: Race Best Predicts Whether You Live Near Pollution | The Nation


I’m almost posting consistently once a week (almost) and thinking I might even graduate to posting twice a week. I know in the 24 hr news cycle, that’s not really much, but it’s a big deal for me because this time last year, I was posting maybe once a month at best. The hardest part about posting is the overwhelming feeling that I have to write a comprehensive treatise with a thesis, citations, countering opinions, a proper conclusion—basically a full-fledged, academic essay. The time it takes me to write a post is usually 5 to 6 hours—I once wrote a blog post in 2 or 3 hours. I was so proud of myself.

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INDIAN RURAL LIFE - A woman herding two cows.

A woman herding two cows. Credit: Vijayamurthy sadagopalan

With more than 800 million people living in extreme poverty and many more struggling to make an honest living, it is clear that the current global economic model isn’t working for everyone. Economic growth often comes at the expense of the majority, with short-term financial gains trumping long-term sustainability. The current global obsession with economic growth, alongside the enormous over-consumption enjoyed by the wealthiest people on the planet, has brought us all to the brink of catastrophic climate change.

Earthrise presenter Ndoni Khanyile travels to Burkina Faso where farmers are embracing agroecology as a means of feeding the most vulnerable and visits villagers in Uttar Pradesh in India, who are turning to solar microgrids for energy.

Watch the video at: Another Giant Leap – Al Jazeera English


Image of a cartoon planet earth crowded with people, some of which are falling off.

China recently announced that it would replace its one-child policy with a two-child policy, adding more than 30 million people to the country’s labor force by 2050. Many have criticized the most populated nation in the world for such a draconian law because infringes upon people’s freedom and reproductive autonomy.

Yet the same logic behind the policy is often used by people who claim to care about the environment. The earth can’t support many more people, the environmentalists say in response to population estimates of over 8 billion. Under this view, in order to preserve natural resources, we must slow global human population growth. They talk about “overpopulation” and cite projected rates of population growth in the global south and subsequent wildlife loss and environmental degradation. Continue reading


Al Jolson, American minstrel performer, in blackface stereotyping Black people

Al Jolson, a white Jewish minstrel performer pictured in blackface and without makeup. Source: Examiner.com

Rachel Dolezal, white woman who created a Black identity and used blackface to advance career in civil rights

Rachel Dolezal, a white academic pictured in blackface as an adult and without blackface as a teen

Given that U.S. media outlets are teeming with stories about Rachel Dolezal, a white woman who has been using blackface and a fabricated past to advance her career, it seemed appropriate that I use this space to reflect on some fundamental concepts that have been alluded to but not strongly articulated by the many think pieces that have since come out.  I do so not only because of the impact Dolezal’s deception has had on my community,* but because it offers me the opportunity to discuss power, identity, and how both impact social equity, one of the three prongs of sustainability. Continue reading

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