Tag Archive: the 3 Rs



Food scraps with Bokashi bran sprinkled on top, in a fermenting bin

Bokashi composting is an anaerobic process that relies on inoculated bran to ferment organic material in a tightly closed container.

June 2017 Update: I first posted this on December 26, 2016. Since then. I’ve added food scraps and some other biodegradable materials into my Bokashi bin, let it sit, drain off the liquid—all the things one should do to maintain the fermentation. During this time, I saw a white, fluffy mold grow on the edge of the bin in quarter-sized spots. It never got out of hand, just something I hadn’t expected.

My verdict after 7 months of use: the waste didn’t break down as much as I had hoped. Most of what I’d added remained visibly discernible (I could still tell what was the sweet potatoes, rinds, and other foods). I also need to think about the next stage for this fermented waste, as I don’t have a lawn to bury it into to further decompose. As I learned, this is not something you can add to vermicomposting, as the worms RUN AWAY from the fermented shlosh (I ended up getting worms to add to my GT2 tower). In other words, this might be a good idea for someone who has a backyard, or has gardener friends, but not for someone who lives in apartment. I’ll keep the remainder of my original post for those interested in the basics.

If you’re a longtime reader, you’ll know that part of my green lifestyle involves composting and gardening. I just moved into an apartment without a patio or outdoor space, but I still want to compost and grow some of my food. After doing some research, I decided to get a Bokashi composting bin (this one, if you’re curious) and a Garden Tower 2 (GT2) gardening system. The Bokashi bin helps breakdown food scraps through fermentation, which I then put in the GT2 to finish decomposing and feed my veggies, eliminating the need for a large compost bin and worms.

I’ll make another post about vermicomposting (which I did before I moved and recommend if you can maintain it), and can even talk a little bit more about my gardening plans. Today’s post, however, is really to introduce the concept of Bokashi composting. Continue reading

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This is my first winter on the East Coast and I’m really starting to miss having sunny skies and green plants all around me. I’m going to grow some potted plants indoors using cuttings, found rocks, and tin cans to re-purpose as pots. I have a general idea of what I want, but it never hurts to get some inspiration…

Bring the outdoors in to your home with these ideas for how to make small-scale plant holders, grow self-sustaining indoor gardens and more.

Source: 10 DIY Indoor Gardens for the Urban Gardener | eHow


Widespread adoption of products labelled “biodegradable” will not significantly decrease the volume of plastic entering the ocean or the physical and chemical risks that plastics pose to marine environment, accord to a United Nations report released today.

Read the full article at: United Nations News Centre – Biodegradable plastics are not the answer to reducing marine litter, says UN

 


Image of a person rolling lettuce in a dark towel.

Image of a person rolling lettuce in a dark towel.

Almost like milk, plastic is found in all kinds of things. I didn’t realize cans are coated with BPA—I’ll have to start buying dried beans and budget soak time into my cooking (oof!). The produce in towels trick seems clever, too.

Have you tried any of these “life hacks”?


TerraCycle Zero Waste boxes allows you to collect waste and recycle it into new products.

TerraCycle Zero Waste boxes allows you to collect waste and recycle it into new products.

Mainstream conversations about “living green” or being sustainable usually revolve around reducing our footprint on the environment. (The idea that humans need to minimize our presence, as though we’re some kind of disease, separate from our environment, is another blog post for another day). I find it problematic because that way of thinking is inherently antithetical to sustainability: reducing the devastating impact of our current consumption simply means accepting the status quo and prolonging the inevitable. True sustainability means transforming our footprint so that it is not a burden to our environment. Continue reading


CD mosaic glazing flower pot

What an excellent way to reuse those scratched or otherwise unusable CDs.

From The DIY ShowEarth Day -DIY Gazing Flower Pot

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